DO:
1. Consider the long-term strategy for the name you’re developing and how the new brand name will fit into your company’s brand architecture and brand portfolio systems.
2. Consider the real fixed and potential costs involved in creating, registering, and defending a new name.
3. Do a thorough inventory of competing names and brands – cast a wide net.

4. Keep an open mind and generate a lot of options, hundreds if possible.
5. Set up a defined criterion as to how names will be judged in the process and stick to it.
6. Take the time to conduct native speaker linguistic checks.
7. Seek out and use one of the many specialized naming consultancies and trademark attorneys to help navigate the numerous pitfalls associated with the naming process.
8. Communicate how the name fits into the overall strategy for the business.
9. Allocate the proper amount of time and resources to communicate your new brand name to your intended target audiences.

DON’T:
1. Fall in love with any specific name early in the process.
2. Have too many people involved in the name selection process.
3. Have the conversation again. Once the name has been selected do not communicate what the second choice or other options on the list were.
4. Short cut the process, sooner or later shortcuts will come back to haunt you and could be potentially expensive and embarrassing to your company.
5. Rule out an alternate domain name if the one you’re after is already taken. If another company already has possession of a domain name in which you’re interested, consider creating an alternate version.
6. Rush the process. Naming done well and on a multi-country or global scale takes time.
7. Ask your spouse or close friends for their opinion.
8. Expect to gain 100% consensus from your decision-making team. Select the name that fits your criteria the best.
9. Forget to defend your name in the marketplace – establish an ongoing monitoring program to protect your brand asset.